The GeeksverseLeaving Proof 317 | Filipino artist spotlight: Ernesto Patricio, Ed Ramos, and Jess Ramos

Leaving Proof 317 | Filipino artist spotlight: Ernesto Patricio, Ed Ramos, and Jess Ramos
Published on Friday, September 9, 2016 by

In today’s Filipino artist spotlight: Ernesto Patricio (G.I. Combat, The Unexpected, The Witching Hour), Ed Ramos (Secrets of Sinister House), and Jess Ramos (Forbidden Tales of Dark Mansion).

Author’s Note: Readers who have been following me on Tumblr will know that I’ve recently started a series of weekly posts highlighting the the “Filipino Wave” artists who worked on the horror, sci-fi, western, war, fantasy, and sword-and-sorcery comics published by DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Warren Publishing, and other outfits in the 1970s and 1980s. Today’s column is a collection of the most recent posts in the series.  

As with all the art I post in this blog, the images below are being shared in the spirit of fair use.

Ernesto Patricio

Ernesto Patricio was among the first Filipino artists to work for DC Comics in the early 1970s, his debut coming in an eight-page strip for House of Mystery #206 (September 1972):

Patricio’s American debut strip is also notable for being a rare example of a DC comics anthology story to be written by a Filipino contributor—Virgilio Redondo, the legendary Nestor Redondo’s older brother and a capable artist in his own right—as the vast majority of the DC comics anthology strips and shorts illustrated by the Filipino Wave artists were written by either American or uncredited contributors.

Over the next several years, Patricio made the rounds of DC’s various horror/mystery comics anthologies, only once working outside of DC Comics by co-illustrating (with fellow Filipino artist Romy Gamboa) a black & white comic book adaptation of Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea for Pendulum Press (this comic would later be re-published by Marvel in color as Marvel Classics Comics #4). Below is a story he illustrated for The Unexpected #153 (December 1973), showing his solid storytelling and rendering chops:

Towards the late 1970s and early 1980s, Patricio adopted a rougher, grittier inking style, which coincided with his being assigned more frequently to DC’s war-themed comics anthologies. Perhaps his best work from this period is the story below, a Korean War-set short written by Archie Goodwin which appeared in All Out War #4 (March/April 1980):

All in all, Patricio penciled and/or inked a total of 53 strips for American publishers between 1973 and 1986—he was a prolific and very capable artist who would have probably achieved wider acclaim had he not entered the American comics scene alongside veritable giants such as Alex Niño, Nestor Redondo, Tony DeZuniga, Alfredo Alcala, and Rudy Nebres (although the same could be said for similarly overshadowed artists like Fred Carrillo, E. R. Cruz, Teny Henson, and so many others).

Ernesto Patricio’s American comics bibliography (excludes reprints):

  • 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1973, Pendulum Press) [NOTE: Co-credited as artist with Romy Gamboa]
  • “Road to Sunchon”: All Out War #4 (March-April 1980, DC Comics)
  • “The Fortune-Cookie Fighters”: DC Special Series #22 (September 1980, DC Comics)
  • “Death for Rent”: Elvira’s House of Mystery #10 (December 1986, DC Comics)
  • “Specter’s Notebook”: Forbidden Tales of Dark Mansion #9 (January-February 1973, DC Comics)
  • “Annie’s Got a Gun”: G.I. Combat #214 (June-July 1979, DC Comics)
  • “The Girl and the Big Gun”: G.I. Combat #239 (March 1982, DC Comics)
  • “Five Nails from Freedom”: G.I. Combat #242 (June 1982, DC Comics)
  • “The Anzac Chain”: G.I. Combat #250 (February 1983, DC Comics)
  • “The Non-Combat Commando”: G.I. Combat #255 (July 1983, DC Comics)
  • “The First Battle”: G.I. Combat #258 (October 1983, DC Comics) [NOTE: Pencils only]
  • “Your Mission…Die!”: G.I. Combat #266 (June 1984, DC Comics)
  • “Brother, Let Me Die!”: G.I. Combat #270 (October 1984, DC Comics)
  • “Sitting Target”: G.I. Combat #273 (January 1985, DC Comics) [NOTE: Pencils only]
  • “Death Came Creeping”: Ghosts #18 (September 1973, DC Comics) [NOTE: Pencils only]
  • “The Haunted Horns of Death”: Ghosts #22 (January 1974, DC Comics)
  • “The Specter in the Flames”: Ghosts #26 (May 1974, DC Comics)
  • “The Phantom Decoy”: Ghosts #54 (May 1977, DC Comics)
  • “Invasion of the Spectral Swarm”: Ghosts #70 (November 1978, DC Comics)
  • “A Real Mother!”: House of Mystery #206 (September 1972, DC Comics)
  • “Man Without Fear”: House of Mystery #285 (October 1980, DC Comics)
  • “Slave of the Pharaoh”: House of Mystery #286 (November 1980, DC Comics)
  • “A Rift In the Veil”: House of Mystery #306 (July 1982, DC Comics)
  • “Who Goes There?”: House of Secrets #142 (October-November 1976, DC Comics)
  • “The Wheel of Karma”: Secrets of Haunted House #22 (March 1980, DC Comics)
  • “Die from Laughter”: Secrets of Haunted House #30 (November 1980, DC Comics)
  • “A Crutch in Time”: Secrets of Haunted House #39 (August 1981, DC Comics)
  • “Asteroid Treachery”: Time Warp #4 (April-May 1980, DC Comics)
  • “The Uncommon Cold”: Time Warp #4 (April-May 1980, DC Comics)
  • “Who’s That Sleeping in My Grave?”: The Unexpected #153 (December 1973, DC Comics)
  • “Trial By Error”: The Unexpected #158 (July-August 1974, DC Comics)
  • “Flight to Frenzy”: The Unexpected #182 (November-December 1977, DC Comics)
  • “The Dead Don’t Always Die”: The Unexpected #183 (January-February 1978, DC Comics)
  • “A Frightening Fish Story”: The Unexpected #187 (September-October 1978, DC Comics)
  • “Never Trust a Devil-Doll”: The Unexpected #196 (March 1980, DC Comics)
  • “Last Laugh of a Corpse”: The Unexpected #197 (April 1980, DC Comics)
  • “Summer Camp”: The Unexpected #200 (July 1980, DC Comics)
  • “Hang Your Head Down, Joe Mundy”: The Unexpected #203 (October 1980, DC Comics)
  • “Beware the Killer Clone”: The Unexpected #203 (October 1980, DC Comics)
  • “Ugly to Look At And Frightful to Know”: The Unexpected #206 (January 1981, DC Comics)
  • “An Evil Pair”: Weird Mystery Tales #8 (October-November 1973, DC Comics)
  • “The Curse of Zopyrus”: Weird War Tales #73 (March 1979, DC Comics)
  • “Devil’s Due”: Weird War Tales #84 (February 1980, DC Comics)
  • “The Fire Down Below”: Weird War Tales #91 (September 1980, DC Comics)
  • “The Devil’s Chessboard”: The Witching Hour #37 (December 1973, DC Comics)
  • “Jeanette by Candlefright”: The Witching Hour #53 (April 1975, DC Comics)
  • “Half a Killer is Better Than None”: The Witching Hour #66 (October-November 1976, DC Comics)
  • “The Humpty Dumpty Hobo”: The Witching Hour #70 (April 1977, DC Comics)
  • “Smile If It Kills You!”: The Witching Hour #76 (January 1978, DC Comics)
  • “A Charmed Life”: The Witching Hour #82 (July 1978, DC Comics)
  • “The Ace of Death”: The Witching Hour #84 (September 1978, DC Comics)
  • “Think Murder”: The Witching Hour #84 (September 1978, DC Comics)
  • “Our Subject for Tonight Is ‘Fear’”: The Witching Hour #85 (October 1978, DC Comics) [NOTE: Pencils only]

Ed Ramos

One of the first Filipino artists to work for DC Comics, Ed Ramos has a single American comics work to his credit, penciling a five-page story penned by John Albano for Secrets of Sinister House #6 (August/September 1972). The strip featured inking by fellow Filipino artist Mar Amongo.

There’s very little reliable biographical information on Ed Ramos online, and the name may very well be an alias.

Jess Ramos

Jess Ramos was already an accomplished komiks artist in the Philippines when he was hired in the early 1970s by DC Comics. Ramos got his start in the Filipino comics industry in the 1950s, making his reputation as a solid draftsman on historical dramas and romance serials. His sole American comics appearance, however, was in a DC horror title, penciling and inking an eight-page, Jack Oleck-penned story in Forbidden Tales of Dark Mansion #9 (January-February 1973):

After his brief dalliance with the American comics industry, Ramos continued on as a local komiks illustrator, with some of his more notable works being Tagalog-language comics adaptations of foreign novels such as Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables and Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms.

Have Your Say
Your Name ↓
Your Email ↓
Your Website ↓
Tell us what you think of this story ↓
You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>
Advertisements

Connect With Us!
The Geeksverse on Instagram
Recent Comments